October 29, 2014

Australian Terror Recruiter Mohammad Ali Baryalei Is So Thunderstruck

He's totally 100% dead Jim!

AUSTRALIA’S most senior ­Islamic State fighter, who allegedly instigated a plot to behead a random member of the public in Sydney’s streets last month, has been killed in a coalition airstrike on the Syrian border town of ­Kobane, his friends have claimed.

Authorities were working last night to verify reports that ­Mohammad Ali Baryalei was “martyred’’ three days ago while fighting with Islamic State, the terror group to which he allegedly recruited scores of young Aus­tralians. The former drug-­abusing Kings Cross bouncer would be the first Australian fighter killed in the US-led bombing campaign that has been striking Islamic State targets inside Syria and Iraq since August.

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Two of Baryalei’s Syria-based friends, who were fellow alumni of the Sydney “Street Dawah” group he led, told The Australian the one-time bit-part actor was killed in an airstrike at least three days ago in Kobane.

Mohamed Zuhbi and Abdul Salam Mahmoud, who have been undertaking humanitarian work focused on the Syrian port city of Lattakia, outside Islamic State’s caliphate, said the reports of Bary­alei’s demise were true.

“It was an airstrike, not sure by whom,” Mr Zuhbi said in an ­online interview with The Aus­tralian. “I personally received news from a brother who was with him for the most part of his journey so I believe it is true.”

See that's him right there! The one running for his life.... and losing.

You're welcome Australia, it was nothing.

By Howie at 09:13 AM | Comments |

October 01, 2014

Afghan Soldiers Who Went AWOL To Canada Seeking Asylum Are Total Islamophobes

These soldiers fear that if they return to Afghanistan the government might fall and/or
the Taliban will cut their heads off. That's just crazy.

They watched a YouTube video to find the best way to cross the border into Canada. They made their getaway during a group outing to Walmart. And they spent more than $1,600 on taxis to travel from Cape Cod to a border checkpoint in Niagara Falls — just steps away, they hoped, from asylum and a new life.

The three Afghan soldiers who fled a training exercise on Camp Edwards last month never made it past the famed Rainbow Bridge to Canada. Instead, they are fighting deportation from a US immigration jail in this town surrounded by cornfields and cabbage patches — and on Tuesday, explained for the first time why they disappeared.

To send them back to the Afghan army, they say, would be to give them a death sentence. Family members of two soldiers have reported recent death threats. The men fear that if they return, they could be the victim of a Taliban assassin’s bullet.

“They catch us, they kill us,” Major Jan Arash, a slight 48-year-old man with thinning hair, said of the Taliban. “They tip those who kill us.”

The soldiers said the Taliban are targeting them for fighting alongside the Americans, and they are constantly dodging sniper fire for $400 to $500 a month in pay and little protection.

They sought asylum in Canada because they figured it was more likely to grant them protection than the United States.

“For me is not important, Canada or America,” he said. “I need just asylum.”

Well that certainly is between a rock and a hard place. If Obama lets them stay, he is admitting the Taliban is still dangerous. If he sends them home, he sends men who have served with us, for us he quite possibly is sending them to their death.

I for one would grant them Asylum, because being kind of a phobe myself, I think their fears that Taliban might chop off their heads is justified.

By Howie at 08:05 AM | Comments |

September 30, 2014

US Leaving Afghanistan? Not Quite?

Well it appears Obama may be at last learning.

Afghan Ministry of Foreign Affairs: SECURITY AND DEFENSE COOPERATION AGREEMENT
BETWEEN
THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
AND
THE ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF AFGHANISTAN


Preamble

The United States of America (hereinafter, “the United States”) and the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan (hereinafter, “Afghanistan”), hereinafter referred to collectively as “the Parties” and singularly as a “Party;”

Recognizing the Enduring Strategic Partnership Agreement between the United States of America and the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, signed May 2, 2012, (the "Strategic Partnership Agreement") and reaffirming that, as recognized in that Agreement, the Parties are committed to strengthen long-term strategic cooperation in areas of mutual interest, including: advancing peace, security, and stability; strengthening state institutions; supporting Afghanistan’s long-term economic and social development; and encouraging regional cooperation;

Confirming the recognition in the Strategic Partnership Agreement that cooperation between the Parties is based on mutual respect and shared interests;

Emphasizing also the Strategic Partnership Agreement’s recognition that the Parties will go forward in partnership with confidence because they are committed to seeking a future of justice, peace, security, and opportunity for the Afghan people, as well as the reaffirmation of the Parties’ strong commitment to the sovereignty, independence, territorial integrity, and national unity of Afghanistan;

Recognizing the enduring partnership between the United States and Afghanistan, and affirming the mutual intent of the Parties to expand, mature, promote and further elevate their security and defense cooperation based on this Agreement

Its worth noting that the Khorasan group that Obama has been hitting is really just a core group of AQ and Talibs that left the Afghanistan/Pakistan theater to fight in Syria.

So the focus has really shifted from Afghanistan. Still, I think having a capability to poke the Taliban and AQ in the eye now and then is required. Otherwise the New Afghan President and government will be very short lived.

Hat Tip: Blogs of War.

Read the rest below the fold.

Desiring to continue to foster close cooperation concerning defense and security arrangements in order to strengthen security and stability in Afghanistan, contribute to regional and international peace and stability, combat terrorism, achieve a region which is no longer a safe haven for al-Qaida and its affiliates, and enhance the ability of Afghanistan to deter threats against its sovereignty, security, and territorial integrity; and noting that the United States does not seek permanent military facilities in Afghanistan, or a presence that is a threat to Afghanistan’s neighbors, and has pledged not to use Afghan territory or facilities as a launching point for attacks against other countries;

Recalling the Chicago Summit Declaration on Afghanistan, issued on May 21, 2012, by the Heads of State and Government of Afghanistan and Nations Contributing to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF), and specifically, the participants’ renewed firm commitment to a sovereign, secure, and democratic Afghanistan and acknowledgment that ISAF’s mission will be concluded by the end of 2014 and that their close partnership will continue beyond the end of the transition period including through NATO and Afghanistan’s mutual commitment to work to establish a new NATO-led Mission to train, advise, and assist the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces (ANDSF), and noting here that such a mission will also need to be provided with the necessary authorities, status arrangements, and legal basis;

Reaffirming the continued support of the Parties for regional cooperation and coordination mechanisms, with a goal of increasing security and stability by reducing tensions, uncertainty, and misunderstanding;

Recalling the 2013 Loya Jirga’s recognition that this Security and Defense Cooperation Agreement between the United States and Afghanistan is important for the security of Afghanistan;

Desiring to develop further the means of defense and security cooperation between the Parties, based on the principles of full respect for the independence, sovereignty, and integrity of their territories, and non-interference in the domestic affairs of each other, in order to promote security and stability in the region, and to combat terrorism;

Agreeing on the importance of cooperative relationships between Afghanistan and its neighbors conducted on the basis of mutual respect, non-interference, and equality and calling on all nations to respect Afghanistan’s sovereignty and territorial integrity, and to refrain from interfering in Afghanistan’s internal affairs and democratic processes; and

Affirming also that the Parties’ cooperation is based on full respect for the sovereignty of each Party, the purposes of the United Nations Charter, and a shared desire to provide a framework for defense and security cooperation between the Parties; and reaffirming their strong commitment to the sovereignty, independence, territorial integrity, and national unity of Afghanistan, as well as respect for Afghan laws, customs and traditions;

Have agreed as follows:

ARTICLE 1

Definitions

1. “United States forces” means the entity comprising the members of the force and of the civilian component, and all property, equipment, and materiel of the United States Armed Forces present in the territory of Afghanistan.

2. “Member of the force” means any person belonging to the land, sea, or air services of the United States Armed Forces.

3. “Member of the civilian component” means any person employed by the United States Department of Defense (DoD) who is not a member of the force. However, “member of the civilian component” does not mean persons who are permanently resident in Afghanistan or Afghan nationals who normally reside in Afghanistan.

4. “Executive Agent” means DoD for the United States and the Ministry of Defense (MOD) for Afghanistan. The Executive Agent serves as the principal contact for its respective Party for the implementation of this Agreement.

5. “United States contractors” means persons and legal entities who are supplying goods and services in Afghanistan to or on behalf of United States forces under a contract or subcontract with or in support of United States forces.

6. “United States contractor employees” means the employees of United States contractors.

7. “Agreed facilities and areas” means the facilities and areas in the territory of Afghanistan provided by Afghanistan at the locations listed in Annex A, and such other facilities and areas in the territory of Afghanistan as may be provided by Afghanistan in the future, to which United States forces, United States contractors, United States contractor employees, and others as mutually agreed, shall have the right to access and use pursuant to this Agreement.

8. “Afghan National Defense and Security Forces” or “ANDSF” means the entity comprising the members of the security forces under the Ministry of Interior and the Ministry of Defense of Afghanistan and, as appropriate, the National Directorate of Security, and other entities as mutually agreed.

9. “Taxes” means all taxes, duties (including customs duties), fees, and similar or related charges of whatever kind, imposed by the Government of Afghanistan which, for the purposes of this Agreement, means by governmental authorities of Afghanistan at any level, including provincial and district levels, and by the agencies of such governmental authorities.
ARTICLE 2

Purpose and Scope

1. The Parties shall continue to foster close cooperation to strengthen security and stability in Afghanistan, counter-terrorism, contribute to regional and international peace and stability, and enhance the ability of Afghanistan to deter internal and external threats against its sovereignty, security, territorial integrity, national unity, and its constitutional order. Unless otherwise mutually agreed, United States forces shall not conduct combat operations in Afghanistan.

2. To that end, the United States shall undertake supporting activities, as may be agreed, in close cooperation and coordination with Afghanistan, to assist ANDSF in developing capabilities required to provide security for all Afghans including as may be mutually agreed: advising, training, equipping, supporting, and sustaining ANDSF, including in field engineering, countering improvised explosive devices and explosive ordinance disposal; establishing and upgrading ANDSF transportation and logistics systems; developing intelligence sharing capabilities; strengthening Afghanistan’s Air Force capabilities; conducting combined military exercises; and other activities as may be agreed. The Parties will continue to work on the details of ANDSF development as set forth in the Afghan Program of Record, at the Chicago Summit in 2012, and in the context of the Security Consultative Forum.

3. The Parties recognize that ANDSF are responsible for securing the people and territory of Afghanistan. The Parties shall work to enhance ANDSF’s ability to deter and respond to internal and external threats. Upon request, the United States shall urgently determine support it is prepared to provide ANDSF in order to respond to threats to Afghanistan’s security.

4. The Parties acknowledge that U.S. military operations to defeat al-Qaida and its affiliates may be appropriate in the common fight against terrorism. The Parties agree to continue their close cooperation and coordination toward those ends, with the intention of protecting U.S. and Afghan national interests without unilateral U.S. military counter-terrorism operations. U.S. military counter-terrorism operations are intended to complement and support ANDSF’s counter-terrorism operations, with the goal of maintaining ANDSF lead, and with full respect for Afghan sovereignty and full regard for the safety and security of the Afghan people, including in their homes.

5. In furtherance of the activities and operations referred to in this Article, and for other purposes and missions as may be mutually agreed, and consistent with the authorizations as detailed in this Agreement, United States forces may undertake transit, support, and related activities, including as may be necessary to support themselves while they are present in Afghanistan under the terms of this Agreement, and such other activities as detailed in this Agreement, or as may be mutually agreed.

6. This Agreement, including any Annexes and any Implementing Agreements or Arrangements, provides the necessary authorizations for the presence and activities of United States forces in Afghanistan and defines the terms and conditions that describe that presence, and in the specific situations indicated herein, the presence and activities of United States contractors and United States contractor employees in Afghanistan.

ARTICLE 3

Laws

1. It is the duty of members of the force and of the civilian component to respect the Constitution and laws of Afghanistan and to abstain from any activity inconsistent with the spirit of this Agreement and, in particular, from any political activity in the territory of Afghanistan. It is the duty of United States forces authorities to take necessary measures to that end.

2. The Parties’ respective obligations under this Agreement, and any subsequent arrangements, are without prejudice to Afghan sovereignty over its territory, and each Party’s right of self-defense, consistent with international law. Cooperation and activities relating to implementation of this Agreement shall be consistent with the Parties’ respective commitments and obligations under international law.
3.


ARTICLE 4

Developing and Sustaining Afghanistan’s Defense and Security Capabilities

1. With full respect for Afghanistan’s sovereignty, the Parties recognize Afghanistan’s current requirement for continued international security assistance, and share the goal of Afghanistan taking increasing and, ultimately full, responsibility for funding its defense and security needs and sustaining ANDSF.

2. Afghanistan shall make, consistent with its political and economic stability and its general economic condition, the full contribution permitted by its manpower, resources, and facilities to the development and sustainment of its own defense and security forces. Afghanistan shall take all necessary measures to develop and sustain its defense and security capacities.

3. So long as the Strategic Partnership Agreement so provides, and guided by the pledges set forth at the Chicago Summit in 2012, the United States shall have an obligation to seek funds on a yearly basis to support the training, equipping, advising and sustaining of ANDSF, so that Afghanistan can independently secure and defend itself against internal and external threats, and help ensure that terrorists never again encroach on Afghan soil and threaten Afghanistan, the region, and the world. The United States shall consult with Afghanistan regarding the amount of funding needed to accomplish the purposes of this Agreement, keeping in mind pledges made in Chicago, and shall take the results of those consultations into consideration in executing this obligation. Taking into account Afghanistan’s annual priorities, the United States shall direct appropriate funds through Afghan Government budgetary mechanisms, to be managed by relevant Afghan institutions implementing financial management standards of transparency and accountability, and procurement, audit, and regulatory oversight in accordance with international best practices.

4. The Parties recognize the importance of ANDSF having the necessary equipment and materiel to secure Afghanistan. To that end, the United States shall continue to cooperate with Afghanistan on providing equipment and materiel for ANDSF.

5. Afghanistan and the United States may cooperate and coordinate with other countries to strengthen ANDSF, as may be mutually agreed, including on equipping ANDSF.

6. In order to contribute effectively to the security of Afghanistan and the region, the United States agrees to cooperate with Afghanistan to continue the development of ANDSF capabilities consistent with Afghanistan’s status as a Major Non-NATO Ally.

7. The Parties recognize the benefits for Afghanistan’s defense and security to be derived from developing defense capabilities and systems that are consistent with NATO standards and that promote interoperability with NATO. The Parties shall coordinate in the development of Afghanistan’s defense and security forces, equipment, materiel, facilities, operational doctrine, and institutions to achieve standardization and interoperability with NATO, in order to promote further the effective utilization and maintenance of defense and security assistance provided to Afghanistan, and to maximize the benefits of cooperation between ANDSF and United States forces. This coordination shall not preclude Afghanistan from procuring independently equipment and material for ANDSF from non-NATO countries with its own resources.

ARTICLE 5
Defense and Security Cooperation Mechanisms

1. The Parties agree to direct the United States - Afghanistan Working Group on Defense and Security Cooperation, established under the Strategic Partnership Agreement, to:

a. Develop appropriate measures of effectiveness for the analysis and strengthening of Afghanistan’s use of available defense and security resources, consistent with the purpose and scope of this Agreement;

b. Complete semi-annual assessments of actual performance against these measures to inform the Parties’ respective resource allocation decisions and their cooperation in developing and sustaining Afghanistan’s defense capabilities;

c. Develop a process consistent with the purpose and scope of this Agreement, for making timely, accurate, and effective cooperative assessments of internal and external threats to Afghanistan; and

d. Make specific recommendations on enhancing information and intelligence sharing and evaluation.

2. The Parties share the objective of continuing to improve their ability to consult on such threats, including considering how to establish secure or dedicated channels of communication.
ARTICLE 6
External Aggression

1. Afghanistan has been subject to aggression and other uses of force inconsistent with the United Nations Charter by foreign states and externally based or supported armed groups. In the context of this Agreement, the Parties strongly oppose such uses of armed force or threats thereof against the territorial integrity or political independence of Afghanistan, including in this regard provision to armed groups of support, such as sanctuary or arms, by any state or other armed groups. The Parties agree to cooperate to strengthen Afghanistan’s defenses against such threats to its territorial integrity, sovereignty or political independence.

2. The United States shall regard with grave concern any external aggression or threat of external aggression against the sovereignty, independence, and territorial integrity of Afghanistan, recognizing that such aggression may threaten the Parties’ shared interests in Afghanistan’s stability and regional and international peace and stability.

3. On a regular basis, the Parties shall consult on potential political, diplomatic, military, and economic measures that could form part of an appropriate response in the event of such external aggression or the threat of external aggression against Afghanistan. Consultations shall seek to develop a list of political, diplomatic, military, and economic measures.

4. In the event of external aggression or the threat of external aggression against Afghanistan, the Parties shall hold consultations on an urgent basis to develop and implement an appropriate response, including, as may be mutually determined, consideration of available political, diplomatic, military, and economic measures on the list developed pursuant to paragraph 3, in accordance with their respective constitutional procedures.

5. The Parties shall develop comprehensive procedures to promote the effective accomplishment of such regular and urgent consultations.

a. Such comprehensive procedures shall recognize consultations involving the participation of the United States Secretary of State and Afghanistan Foreign Minister, the United States Secretary of Defense and Afghanistan Defense Minister, and respective Ambassadors in Kabul and Washington, D.C. as primary channels to initiate urgent consultations in the event of external aggression, or threat of external aggression.

b. Such comprehensive procedures shall not, however, limit or prejudice the Parties’ ability to consult each other in other channels or through other mechanisms, as urgency or exigency may require.

6. The Parties agree to direct the United States - Afghanistan Working Group on Defense and Security Cooperation to promote the effective implementation of this Article, including development of such comprehensive procedures, and review on a regular basis the list of measures developed pursuant to paragraph 3.

ARTICLE 7

Use of Agreed Facilities and Areas

1. Afghanistan hereby provides access to and use of the agreed facilities and areas, as defined in paragraph 7 of Article 2, solely to implement the purpose and scope of this Agreement, taking into account locations of ANDSF and the local Afghan population. Access to and use of such agreed facilities and areas for other purposes shall be as mutually agreed by the Parties.

2. Under this agreement, Afghanistan hereby authorizes United States forces to exercise all rights and authorities within the agreed facilities and areas that are necessary for their use, operation, defense, or control, including the right to undertake new construction works. United States forces may carry out such construction works with members of the force and the civilian component or by contract.

3. Afghanistan hereby authorizes United States forces to control entry to agreed facilities and areas that have been provided for United States forces’ exclusive use, and to coordinate entry with Afghan authorities at joint-use agreed facilities and areas, for the purposes of safety and security. Upon request, the United States shall provide to relevant authorities of Afghanistan access to any agreed facility or area that has been provided for United States forces’ exclusive use. The Parties shall establish mutually agreed procedures regarding Afghan authorities’ access to any agreed facility or area that has been provided for United States forces’ exclusive use. Such procedures and access shall be established with due respect for United States forces operations and security requirements. Acknowledging that United States forces may conduct force protection activities at and in the vicinity of agreed facilities and agreed areas as are necessary, the Parties agree to coordinate and integrate their respective plans for force protection to ensure the safety of United States forces, with full respect for Afghan sovereignty and with full regard for the safety and security of the Afghan people. In furtherance of this objective, United States forces shall not target Afghan civilians, including in their homes, consistent with Afghan law and United States forces’ rules of engagement.

4. In pursuit of the purpose and scope of this Agreement, in particular United States efforts to train, equip, advise, and sustain ANDSF, Afghanistan shall provide all agreed facilities and areas without charge to United States forces.

5. United States forces shall be responsible for the construction, development, operations, and maintenance costs for agreed facilities and areas provided for their exclusive use, unless otherwise agreed by the Parties. Construction, development, operations, and maintenance costs for agreed facilities and areas provided for joint use, or otherwise used jointly by United States forces and ANDSF or other entities, shall be shared on the basis of proportionate use, unless otherwise agreed.

6. The United States confirms its commitment to respect relevant Afghan environmental and health and safety laws, regulations, and standards in the execution of its policies. United States forces operations and activities on agreed facilities and areas shall be conducted with due regard for the protection of the natural environment and human health and safety, with due respect for applicable Afghan laws and regulations, and in accordance with applicable United States laws and regulations and applicable international agreements.

7. United States forces operations and activities on agreed facilities and areas shall be conducted with full respect for Afghan laws and regulations for the protection of sites or artifacts of historic and cultural heritage. United States forces shall notify and consult immediately with appropriate Afghan authorities through the Joint Commission when sites or artifacts of historic and cultural heritage are discovered on an agreed facility or area.

ARTICLE 8

Property Ownership

1. United States forces shall return to Afghanistan any agreed facility or area, or any portion thereof, including buildings, non-relocatable structures, and assemblies connected to the soil, including those constructed, altered, or improved by United States forces, when no longer needed for United States forces’ use. United States forces shall keep the requirement for such agreed facilities and areas under periodic reassessment with a view toward such return. The Parties or their Executive Agents shall consult regarding the terms of return of any agreed facility or area. The Parties agree to pursue a preventative rather than reactive approach to environmental protection and human health and safety. The Parties recognize that the policies and practices of the United States are designed to avoid such damage and endangerment and to apply the more protective of either Afghan or United States standards. In accordance with United States forces policy, United States forces shall take prompt action to address a substantial impact to human health and safety due to environmental contamination that is caused by activities of United States forces and is located on an agreed facility or area.

2. All buildings, non-relocatable structures, and assemblies connected to the soil at the agreed facilities and areas, including those constructed, used, altered, or improved by United States forces, are for the exclusive use of United States forces, United States contractors, and United States contractor employees, and for others as mutually agreed. All such buildings, non-relocatable structures, and assemblies connected to the soil built by United States forces or provided to United States forces for their access and use may be modified by United States forces, and United States forces may use them exclusively until they are no longer required by United States forces.

3. United States forces and United States contractors shall retain title to all equipment, materiel, supplies, relocatable structures, and other movable property they have installed in, imported into, or acquired within the territory of Afghanistan in connection with the presence of United States forces and United States contractors in Afghanistan. The Parties shall consult regarding the possible transfer to or purchase by Afghanistan of equipment determined to be excess, as may be authorized by United States laws and regulations.

ARTICLE 9

Positioning and Storage of Equipment and Materiel

1. Afghanistan authorizes United States forces to position the equipment, supplies, and materiel of United States forces within agreed facilities and areas, and at other locations as mutually agreed. United States forces shall maintain title to and control over the use and disposition of such equipment, supplies, and materiel that are stored in the territory of Afghanistan and shall have the right to remove such items from the territory of Afghanistan.

2. The United States confirms its commitment to respect relevant Afghan safety laws, regulations, and standards. United States forces shall take all necessary measures to protect and safely store equipment, supplies, and materiel of United States forces that are of a hazardous nature in accordance with applicable United States laws and regulations. In accordance with United States forces policy, United States forces shall take prompt action (1) to clean up spills located on an agreed facility or area; and, (2) to address a substantial impact to human health and safety due to environmental contamination that is caused by activities of United States forces and is located on an agreed facility or area.

3. The United States, taking into account its obligations under the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on their Destruction, done at Paris on January 13, 1993, and the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on their Destruction done at Washington, London and Moscow on April 10, 1972, agrees that chemical and biological weapons shall not be stored in the territory of Afghanistan. The Parties affirm that the United States will not position or store nuclear weapons in the territory of Afghanistan.

ARTICLE 10

Movement of Vehicles, Vessels, and Aircraft

1. Afghanistan has full sovereignty over its airspace, territory, and waters. Management of Afghanistan’s airspace and transportation shall be exercised through relevant Afghan authorities.

2. With full respect for Afghan sovereignty and consistent with the purpose and scope of this Agreement, Afghanistan authorizes United States government aircraft and civil aircraft that are operated by or exclusively for United States forces to enter, exit, overfly, land, take off, conduct aerial refueling, and move within the territory of Afghanistan. United States government aircraft and civil aircraft that are operated by or exclusively for United States forces shall not be subject to payment of overflight or navigation fees, or landing or parking fees at government-owned airfields, or other charges. United States government aircraft shall be operated with full respect for the relevant rules of safety and movement in Afghanistan, including notification requirements. Civil aircraft being operated by or exclusively for United States forces are subject to notification requirements regarding their entry into and exit from the territory of Afghanistan as required by the civil aviation authorities of Afghanistan.

3. With full respect for Afghan sovereignty and consistent with the purpose and scope of this Agreement, Afghanistan authorizes United States government vessels and vehicles and other vessels and vehicles that are operated by or exclusively for United States forces, to enter, exit, and move within the territory of Afghanistan. All such vessels and vehicles shall be operated with full respect for the relevant rules of safety and movement in Afghanistan. Members of the force and of the civilian component have a duty to respect Afghan motor vehicle regulations when operating official vehicles.

4. United States government aircraft, vessels and vehicles shall be free from boarding without the consent of United States forces authorities. United States government aircraft, vessels, and vehicles shall be free from inspection, regulation, or registration requirements within Afghanistan, except as otherwise provided in this Agreement or as otherwise agreed by the Joint Commission.

5. United States forces shall pay reasonable charges for services requested and received for United States government aircraft, vehicles, and vessels, free of taxes or similar charges.

6. The Parties agree to establish procedures to implement this Article. The Parties shall review and update, as appropriate, such procedures, and shall address any issues immediately through the Joint Commission that may arise regarding such procedures.

ARTICLE 11

Contracting Procedures

1. United States forces, in accordance with United States laws, may enter into contracts for the acquisition of articles and services, including construction, in the territory of Afghanistan. Afghanistan recognizes that United States forces are bound by the laws and regulations of the United States in the solicitation, award, and administration of such contracts. United States forces shall strive to utilize Afghan suppliers of goods, products, and services to the greatest extent practicable, in accordance with United States laws and regulations.

2. United States contractors are subject to registration in Afghanistan, via an expedited process that shall include issuance of a business registration license valid for three years and payment of a reasonable, standard, one-time service charge to the Afghanistan Investment Support Agency as required by the laws and regulations of Afghanistan. United States contractors shall otherwise be exempt from all other Afghan licenses and similar requirements in relation to their entry into or execution of contracts and subcontracts with or on behalf of United States forces.

3. Recognizing the importance of transparency, including through the sharing of information and consultations as may be mutually agreed, United States forces shall give due consideration to concerns and disputes expressed by Afghan authorities regarding United States contractors. The Parties will work together to improve transparency, accountability, and effectiveness of contracting processes in Afghanistan with a view to preventing misuse and bad contracting practices.

4. Upon the request of either Party, the Parties shall consult immediately through the Joint Commission concerning any issues, including issues concerning the activities of United States contractors and United States contractor employees, that may arise regarding implementation of this Article.

ARTICLE 12

Utilities and Communications

1. United States forces may produce and provide services including but not limited to water, electricity, and other utilities for agreed facilities and areas and for other locations as mutually agreed. The production and provision of such services shall be notified to and coordinated with the Joint Commission on a periodic basis. United States forces and United States contractors may use Afghan public water, electricity, and other Afghan public utilities on terms and conditions, including rates or charges, no less favorable than those paid by ANDSF, less taxes or similar or related charges, unless otherwise mutually agreed. United States forces’ or United States contractors’ costs shall be equal to their proportionate use of such public utilities.

2. Afghanistan recognizes that United States forces shall use the radio spectrum. The Afghan side shall allocate Afghan owned frequencies based on relevant Afghan regulations. The United States shall be allowed to operate its own telecommunications systems (as telecommunication is defined in the 1992 Constitution of the International Telecommunication Union), including the use of such means and services as required to ensure full ability to operate telecommunications systems, and the use of radio spectrum allocated by appropriate Afghan authorities for this purpose. Use of radio spectrum shall be free of cost to the United States.

3. United States forces, in recognition of Afghan ownership and allocation of frequencies within Afghanistan and in the interest of avoiding mutually disruptive interference, shall coordinate with appropriate Afghan authorities for the allocation of frequencies for United States forces present in Afghanistan. United States forces shall respect frequencies in use by or reserved for local operators.

4. Use of telecommunications by United States forces shall be done in a manner that avoids interference with use of radio spectrum or other telecommunication equipment operated by the Afghan government and other organizations the Afghan government has granted permission to use radio spectrum and/or telecommunications equipment.
ARTICLE 13

Status of Personnel

1. Afghanistan, while retaining its sovereignty, recognizes the particular importance of disciplinary control, including judicial and non-judicial measures, by the United States forces authorities over members of the force and of the civilian component. Afghanistan therefore agrees that the United States shall have the exclusive right to exercise jurisdiction over such persons in respect of any criminal or civil offenses committed in the territory of Afghanistan. Afghanistan authorizes the United States to hold trial in such cases, or take other disciplinary action, as appropriate, in the territory of Afghanistan.

2. If requested by Afghanistan, the United States shall inform Afghanistan of the status of any criminal proceedings regarding offenses allegedly committed in Afghanistan by the members of the force or of the civilian component involving Afghan nationals, including the final disposition of the investigations, or prosecution. If so requested, the United States shall also undertake efforts to permit and facilitate the attendance and observation of such proceedings by representatives of Afghanistan.

3. In the interests of justice, the Parties shall assist each other in investigation of incidents, including the collection of evidence. In investigating offenses, United States authorities shall take into account any report of investigations by Afghan authorities.

4. The United States recognizes the critical role that Afghan law enforcement officials play in the enforcement of Afghan law and order and the protection of the Afghan people. Relevant Afghan authorities shall immediately notify United States forces authorities if they suspect a member of the force or of the civilian component is engaged in the commission of a crime so that United States forces authorities can take immediate action. Members of the force and of the civilian component shall not be arrested or detained by Afghan authorities. Members of the force and of the civilian component arrested or detained by Afghan authorities for any reason, including by Afghan law enforcement authorities, shall be immediately handed over to United States forces authorities.

5. Afghanistan and the United States agree that members of the force and of the civilian component may not be surrendered to, or otherwise transferred to, the custody of an international tribunal or any other entity or state without the express consent of the United States.

6. Afghanistan maintains the right to exercise jurisdiction over United States contractors and United States contractor employees.

ARTICLE 14

Bearing of Arms and Wearing of Uniforms

1. When present in Afghanistan under this Agreement, members of the force and of the civilian component may possess and carry arms in Afghanistan as required for the performance of their duties and as authorized by their orders. When issuing such orders, United States forces authorities shall consider relevant Afghan officials’ views regarding appropriate locations for the presence of arms, including considerations of public safety. In consideration of such views, United States forces shall not, for military operations, enter mosques or other sites of religious significance being used for religious purposes. Members of the force may wear uniforms while in Afghanistan. United States forces authorities shall take appropriate measures to ensure that members of the force and of the civilian component are mindful of their presence in public areas, including in the carrying of weapons.

2. The Parties agree that United States contractors and United States contractor employees are not permitted to wear military uniforms and may only carry weapons in accordance with Afghan laws and regulations.

3. United States contractors performing security services in Afghanistan are subject to all relevant requirements of Afghan laws and regulations.

4. Upon the request of either Party, the Parties shall consult immediately through the Joint Commission concerning any issues that may arise regarding implementation of this Article.

ARTICLE 15

Entry and Exit

1. Members of the force and members of the civilian component may enter and exit Afghanistan at agreed facilities and areas at locations listed in Annex A, at official points of embarkation and debarkation as listed in Annex B, and at other areas as mutually agreed, with identification cards issued by the United States, and either collective or individual movement orders. Passports and visas shall not be required. Such personnel shall be exempt from Afghan law and regulations on registration and control of foreign citizens.

2. United States contractors and United States contractor employees may enter and exit Afghanistan at the places of entry and exit described in paragraph 1 of this Article. Passports and visas shall be required in accordance with Afghan law. If a visa is required, and requested by a United States contractor or a United States contractor employee, it shall provide for multiple entries and exits and shall be valid for a period of not less than one year. The appropriate Afghan authorities may issue or decline to issue required visas expeditiously. In the event Afghanistan declines to issue such visa, the appropriate Afghan authorities shall notify the person concerned and United States forces authorities. For exceptional situations as may be agreed through the Joint Commission, Afghanistan shall seek to put in place and make available to United States contractor employees a process for the issuance of visas upon their arrival in Afghanistan.

3. The United States recognizes the sovereign right of Afghanistan to request the removal of any member of the force or member of the civilian component from Afghanistan. United States forces authorities shall take appropriate measures to expeditiously remove such persons from Afghanistan upon request by proper Afghan authorities.

4. The Parties agree to establish procedures to implement this Article. The Joint Commission shall periodically review and update procedures for appropriate Afghan authorities to process members of the force and of the civilian component who arrive at or depart from the places of entry and exit described in paragraph 1 of this Article, including coordination and inspection of documentation. Afghan authorities may develop lists of members of the force and of the civilian component entering and exiting Afghan territory at the agreed facilities and areas, as necessary.

ARTICLE 16

Importation and Exportation

1. United States forces and United States contractors may import into, export out of, re-export out of, transport, and use in Afghanistan any equipment, supplies, materiel, technology, training, or services. The authorizations in this paragraph do not cover the activities of United States contractors that are not related to the presence of United States forces in Afghanistan. Identifying documents shall be provided to indicate that such equipment, supplies, materiel, technology, training, or services being imported by United States contractors are for United States forces’ purposes and not for any private commercial purposes.

2. Members of the force and of the civilian component, United States contractors, and those United States contractor employees who are not Afghan nationals, may import into, export out of, re-export out of, transport, and use in Afghanistan personal effects. The imported quantities shall be reasonable and proportionate to personal use. The property referred to in this paragraph may not be sold or otherwise transferred in Afghanistan to persons who are not entitled to import such items duty free unless such transfer is in accordance with agreed procedures, including on payment of any taxes or fees due as a result of such transaction, established by the Joint Commission.

3. United States forces authorities, working with relevant Afghan authorities, shall take appropriate measures to ensure that no items or material of cultural or historic significance to Afghanistan are being exported and that, as provided in United States Central Command General Order Number 1, no alcohol, pornography, illegal narcotics, or privately owned firearms, or other contraband or items as may be mutually agreed, are being imported using the authorizations provided in paragraphs 1 and 2 of this Article.

4. The importation, exportation, re-exportation, transportation, and use of any articles brought into Afghanistan pursuant to paragraphs 1 and 2 of this Article shall not be subject to restrictions, such as licensing, inspection or verification, except as provided in this Article, or taxes and customs duties or other charges assessed by government authorities in Afghanistan within the territory of Afghanistan. If Afghan authorities suspect the abuse of the privileges granted in paragraph 2 of this Article to United States contractors and United States contractor employees, then relevant Afghan authorities reserve the right of inspection of such personal effects when arriving or departing from civilian airports in Afghanistan or in personal vehicles at border crossings.

5. The relevant Afghan authorities reserve the right of verification of any container imported by United States contractors and United States contractor employees containing items for United States forces’ purposes in Afghanistan or for personal use, as authorized in paragraphs 1 and 2 of this Article. Without causing undue delay, and upon presentation by the relevant Afghan authorities of information to United States forces authorities that a United States contractor is abusing the authority granted in paragraphs 1 or 2 of this Article, United States forces authorities shall open and verify suspected shipments or containers intended for import in the presence of the Afghan authorities. Afghan authorities shall consent to the security requirements of United States forces and upon request by United States forces authorities permit such verifications to take place within agreed facilities and areas or other areas as mutually agreed.

6. Sharing the common goal with Afghanistan of preventing the improper entry into Afghan markets of items imported into Afghanistan under the terms of this Agreement, United States forces authorities shall take measures to prevent abuse of the authorizations in paragraphs 1 and 2 of this Article, and shall conduct inquiries and assist the relevant Afghan authorities in the conduct of inquiries and the collection of evidence relating to the suspected improper importation, exportation, re-exportation, transfer, or disposition of goods by members of the force, members of the civilian component, United States contractors, and United States contractor employees.

7. Items imported into Afghanistan or purchased in Afghanistan pursuant to this Article may be disposed of in Afghanistan with due respect for Afghan laws and regulations.

8. Upon the request of either Party, the Parties shall review and consult immediately through the Joint Commission concerning any issues that may arise regarding implementation of this Article.


ARTICLE 17

Taxation

1. The acquisition in Afghanistan of articles and services by or on behalf of United States forces shall not be subject to any taxes or similar or related charges assessed within the territory of Afghanistan.

2. United States forces, including members of the force and of the civilian component, shall not be liable to pay any tax or similar or related charges assessed by the Government of Afghanistan within the territory of Afghanistan.

3. United States contractors shall not be liable to pay any tax or similar or related charges assessed by the Government of Afghanistan within the territory of Afghanistan on their activities, and associated income, relating to or on behalf of United States forces under a contract or subcontract with or in support of United States forces. However, United States contractors that are Afghan legal entities shall not be exempt from corporate profits tax that may be assessed by the Government of Afghanistan within the territory of Afghanistan on income received due to their status as United States contractors.

4. United States contractors are subject to Afghan requirements regarding employer withholding of personal income tax from United States contractor employees who normally reside in Afghanistan and from United States contractor employees who are Afghan nationals for payment to Afghanistan as required by the laws and regulations of Afghanistan.

5. United States contractor employees who do not normally reside in Afghanistan and United States contractor employees who are not Afghan nationals shall not be liable to pay any tax or similar or related charges assessed by the Government of Afghanistan within the territory of Afghanistan on their activities, and associated income, relating to a contract or subcontract with or in support of United States forces.

6. United States contractors and United States contractor employees are not exempt under this Agreement from paying taxes assessed by the Government of Afghanistan within the territory of Afghanistan on their activities in Afghanistan that are not associated with supplying goods and services in Afghanistan to or on behalf of United States forces under a contract or subcontract with or in support of United States forces.


ARTICLE 18

Driving and Professional Licenses

1. Afghanistan agrees to accept as valid, without a driving test or fee, driving licenses or permits issued by United States authorities to members of the force or of the civilian component, United States contractors, and United States contractor employees for operation of vehicles, vessels, aircraft, or other equipment by or for United States forces within the territory of Afghanistan.

2. Afghanistan agrees to accept as valid all professional licenses issued by United States authorities to members of the force or of the civilian component and United States contractors or United States contractor employees in relation to the provision of services as part of their official or contractual duties.

3. United States forces authorities shall endeavor to ensure that members of the force or of the civilian component, United States contractors, and United States contractor employees have current, valid driving licenses and permits for operation of vehicles, vessels, aircraft, or other equipment by or for United States forces within the territory of Afghanistan. The Joint Commission shall establish mechanisms to exchange information on United States licenses and permits. In response to requests from Afghan authorities, the United States shall seek to verify the validity of such licenses.

ARTICLE 19

Motor Vehicles

Afghanistan agrees to accept as valid the registration and licensing by United States forces authorities of the official vehicles of United States forces. Upon the request of United States forces authorities, Afghan authorities shall issue, without charge, license plates for United States forces’ official, non-tactical vehicles. United States forces’ official, non-tactical vehicles shall display official Afghan license plates that are indistinguishable from other Afghan license plates, upon their provision by Afghanistan.

ARTICLE 20

Service Support Activities

1. United States forces may directly or through contract establish and operate at agreed facilities and areas service support activities, including military post offices, banking services, military service exchanges, commissaries, recreational service areas, and telecommunications services, including broadcast services. It is not the United States’ intention for broadcasting, media, and entertainment services to reach beyond the scope of the agreed facilities and areas. Taking into consideration Afghan laws, traditions, and customs, United States forces may continue to make available television and radio broadcast services such as media and entertainment programming for the purposes of morale, welfare, and recreation of United States forces and other authorized recipients located on agreed facilities and areas.

2. United States forces shall take appropriate measures to limit broadcasting, television programs, media, and entertainment services to authorized recipients and to agreed facilities and areas.

3. Access to service support activities shall be in accordance with United States regulations. United States forces authorities shall adopt appropriate measures to prevent the abuse of such service support activities and the sale or resale of goods or services to persons who are not authorized to patronize such service support activities or providers.

4. No license, permit, or inspection shall be required by Afghanistan for activities connected with such service support activities.

5. The activities, and any organizations undertaking the activities referred to in this Article, are integral parts of United States forces and shall be accorded the same fiscal and customs exemptions granted to United States forces, including those provided in Articles 16 and 17 of this Agreement. Such organizations and activities shall be maintained and operated in accordance with applicable United States regulations. Such activities shall not be required to collect or pay taxes or to pay other fees related to their operations. Access to these service support activities shall be restricted to members of the force, members of the civilian component, United States contractors and United States contractor employees, and others as may be authorized.

6. Mail shipped within the United States Military Postal Service transportation system shall be exempt from inspection, search, or seizure by Afghan authorities.

7. The Joint Commission shall periodically review the service support activities and resolve by mutual agreement questions arising in the course of implementation of this Article.

ARTICLE 21

Currency and Exchange

The Parties agree to establish procedures regarding currency and exchange. The Parties shall review and update, as appropriate, such procedures and shall address any issues immediately through the Joint Commission that may arise regarding such procedures.


ARTICLE 22

Claims

1. Each Party waives any and all claims (other than contractual claims) against the other for damage to, loss of, or destruction of its property or injury or death to members of United States forces or ANDSF, and their respective civilian components, arising out of the performance of their official duties in Afghanistan.

2. For claims not excluded under paragraph 1 of this Article, United States forces authorities shall pay just and reasonable compensation in settlement of meritorious third party claims arising out of acts or omissions of members of the force and of the civilian component done in the performance of their official duties and incident to the non-combat activities of United States forces. Such claims shall be expeditiously processed and settled by United States forces authorities in accordance with the laws and regulations of the United States and seriously considering the laws, customs, and traditions of Afghanistan.

3. In settling third party claims, United States forces authorities shall take into account any report of investigation or opinion provided to them by Afghan authorities regarding liability or amount of damages.

4. The settlement or adjudication of contract claims shall be carried out in accordance with the terms of the contracts.

5. Upon the request of either Party, the Parties shall consult immediately through the Joint Commission concerning any issues that may arise regarding implementation of this Article.

ARTICLE 23

Annexes

Any Annex appended to this Agreement shall form an integral part of this Agreement, and may be amended by written agreement of the Parties.

ARTICLE 24

Disputes and Implementation

1. Any divergence in views or dispute regarding the interpretation or application of this Agreement shall be resolved through consultations between the Parties and shall not be referred to any national or international court, tribunal or other similar body, or any third party for settlement.

2. The Parties, or their Executive Agents including through the Joint Commission, may enter into Implementing Arrangements and procedures to carry out the provisions of this Agreement.

3. Cooperation under this Agreement is subject to the relevant laws and regulations of the respective Parties, including applicable appropriations laws.

4. United States forces authorities shall pay reasonable, fair market charges, minus any taxes, for goods or services they request and receive.

ARTICLE 25

Joint Commission

1. The Parties hereby establish a Joint Commission to oversee implementation of this Agreement. The Joint Commission shall be co-chaired by representatives of the Executive Agents. The Joint Commission may include other governmental representatives requested by the Executive Agents and appointed by the Parties.

2. The Joint Commission shall determine its own procedures and arrange for such auxiliary organs, including the establishment of Working Groups and administrative services, as may be considered appropriate. Each Executive Agent shall bear the costs of its participation in the Joint Commission.

3. The Joint Commission shall coordinate and exchange information, as appropriate, with the United States - Afghanistan Working Group on Defense and Security Cooperation established under the Strategic Partnership Agreement.

ARTICLE 26

Entry into Force, Amendment, and Termination

1. This Agreement shall enter into force on January 1, 2015, after the Parties notify one another through diplomatic channels of the completion of their respective internal legal requirements necessary for the entry into force of this Agreement. It shall remain in force until the end of 2024 and beyond, unless terminated pursuant to paragraph 4 of this Article.

2. This Agreement, upon its entry into force, shall supersede the exchange of notes dated September 26, 2002, December 12, 2002, and May 28, 2003, regarding the status of United States forces in Afghanistan. This Agreement shall also supersede any prior agreements and understandings which the Parties mutually determine, through a subsequent exchange of diplomatic notes, to be contrary to the provisions of this Agreement.

3. This Agreement may be amended by written agreement of the Parties through the exchange of diplomatic notes.

4. This Agreement may be terminated by mutual written agreement or by either Party upon two years' written notice to the other Party through diplomatic channels. Termination of any Annex to or Implementing Arrangement under this Agreement does not result in termination of this Agreement. Termination of this Agreement in accordance with this paragraph shall, without further action, result in termination of all Annexes and Implementing Arrangements.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the undersigned, being duly authorized by their respective Governments, have signed this Agreement.

DONE at Kabul, this …. day of November 2013 in duplicate, in the English, Pashto, and Dari languages, each text being equally authentic.

FOR THE
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA:

FOR THE ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF AFGHANISTAN:


ANNEX A

List of Locations in Afghanistan of Afghan Facilities and Areas Provided by Afghanistan for United States Forces Access and Use (“Agreed Facilities and Areas”)

Kabul
Bagram
Mazar-i-Sharif
Herat
Kandahar
Shorab (Helmand)
Gardez
Jalalabad
Shindand

Agreed facilities and areas also include other facilities and areas, if any, of which United States forces have the use as of the effective date of this Agreement and other facilities and areas at other locations in Afghanistan as may be agreed and authorized by the Minister of Defense.

ANNEX B

Official Points of Embarkation and Debarkation

Bagram Airbase
Kabul International Airport
Kandahar Airbase
Shendand Airbase
Herat International Airport
Mazar-e-Sharif Airport
Shorab (Helmand)

Land Ports:
Toorkham, Nangarhar Province
Spinboldak, Kandahar Province
Toorghundi, Herat Province
Hairatan, Balkh Province
Sherkhan Bandar, Kunduz Province

Other official points of embarkation and debarkation as may be mutually agreed.

By Howie at 07:48 AM | Comments |

August 08, 2014

Single Afghan Woman Fights Back

(Hat Tip: TROP)

My question is, where are all the men in the town? Are they such cowards that none came to help her? That all they could do is complain about financial losses?

A woman known only as Uzra killed four Taliban members last Friday (August 1) in Nooristan province before being killed along with her toddler.

According to a reporter from Fars News Agency in Kabul, Abdul Baaqi Nooristani, a top security official in Nooristan province told the media today, "A battle between a woman and Taliban militants continued for a few hours. Four militants were killed by her. She was killed at the end, along with her 3-year-old son."

After watching a family member being killed, she had picked up the weapon and fought for two hours before losing the fight for herself and her 3-year-old child.

The incident took place at night in Bargamatal area, where the Taliban have vast presence.

The local inhabitants of the area also complained that the Taliban had caused them heavy financial losses in their latest attack. (Source)

R.I.P., brave Uzra. You are more of a warrior and defender of humanity than your male counterparts.

By DMartyr at 12:50 PM | Comments |

June 03, 2014

Bergdahl Trade Results in New Afghan "Thanksgiving"

Except they ain't having smoked turkey and cranberries.

Goats have been slaughtered and served up across Afghanistan as the Taliban celebrates the release of five Guantanamo Bay detainees as part of a prisoner exchange.

A senior member of the Afghan Taliban has described the exchange of the five detainees for U.S. Army Sgt Bowe Bergdahl as a 'historic moment for us'.

...The Taliban commander told NBC News the exchange was the first time its 'enemy' had 'officially recognized our status.'

He said: 'Once we confirmed the arrival of our five heroes back in Qatar, celebrations started everywhere in Afghanistan and the neighboring Pakistan.'
He went on to say: 'Goats are being slaughtered and served with guests and in some places goats are being cooked in rice.'

Sweet Jesus!?!?

Hat Tip: Pat.

By Howie at 09:46 AM | Comments |

June 02, 2014

Signs, Signs, Everywhere The Signs

That Bowe Berghdal was a deserting traitor. James Rosen at Fox News:

A senior official confirms to Fox News that the conduct of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl -- both in his final stretch of active duty in Afghanistan and then, too, during his time when he lived among the Taliban -- has been thoroughly investigated by the U.S. intelligence community and is the subject of "a major classified file."

In conveying as much, the Defense Department source confirmed to Fox News that many within the intelligence community harbor serious outstanding concerns not only that Bergdahl may have been a deserter but that he may have been an active collaborator with the enemy.

The Pentagon official added pointedly that no relevant congressional committee has sought access to the classified file, but that if such a request were made, key committee chairs would, under previous precedent, likely be granted access to it. Separately, the Pentagon confirmed Monday that it is looking into claims Americans died during the search for Bergdahl.

The administration announced over the weekend that Bergdahl's release had been secured, in exchange for five Taliban prisoners at Guantanamo Bay. President Obama was joined by the soldier's parents in making a public statement on the release Saturday evening from the Rose Garden.

Sources told Fox News that many officials in the Executive Branch are "quite baffled" by the White House's decision to allow the president to stand alongside Bergdahl's father this past weekend, given the father's history of controversial statements, emails and online posts.

Asked Monday about reports that Bergdahl's father was communicating on Twitter with a man described as a Taliban spokesman, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney declined to comment on those reports but defended the administration's handling of the release.

This whole affair, and the rest of this regime's policies have become, to quote Game of Thrones, "a mummer's farce."

I should add that a friend of that intelligence community who recently left it has been sending me links to "Bowe Berghdal Is A Traitor" t-shirts for sale.

Oh, and bewbs.

 photo 8a9ee5b5.jpg

By Vinnie at 05:41 PM | Comments |

May 23, 2014

Hey, How's Obama's Afghan Surge Going?

Remember when Iraq was going to sh*t and it was Bush's fault? Remember when every dead Iraqi was proof that Bush lied and people died? Oh what a difference a "D" in front of your name makes to news coverage:

It was a particularly bloody Wednesday for Afghan police officers, as reports emerged that at least 22 had been killed in four assaults around the country by Taliban insurgents, who also pinned down 40 police officers and officials in a bunker, short on food and ammunition.
Remember, the reason Obama offered us that we hadn't finished the job in Afghanistan is that Bush took his eye off the ball because he was distracted in Iraq.

Now that we've been out of Iraq for years, what's the excuse now? Yet I'm sure this is Bush's fault. Somehow.

By Rusty Shackleford, Ph.D. at 04:24 PM | Comments |

April 16, 2014

*Secret* Document Surprises No One: Afghanistan Not Ready to Govern Self

When I read the headline over at the Washington Times regarding a super-secret State Department memo that claims that Afghanistan won't be ready to govern itself by the time US troops pull out I had to laugh out loud (LOLing, to you younger readers).

That is a .... secret?

Confidential U.S. assessments, which the State Department tried to hide from the public, show nearly all Afghan Cabinet ministries are woefully ill-prepared to govern after the U.S. withdraws its troops, often describing the gaps in knowledge, capability and safeguards as “critical” and describing an infrastructure in danger of collapsing if left to its own accord.
Earth to Captain Obvious: how can something that every single person in America knows* be a "secret"?

*I use know here as an epistemological certainty

By Rusty Shackleford, Ph.D. at 10:55 AM | Comments |

March 18, 2014

Taliban Murder 17 in Afghanistan

Just another normal day in the 'Stan:

A suicide bomber riding a rickshaw blew himself up outside a checkpoint near a market in northern Afghanistan on Tuesday, killing at least 17 civilians, officials said, in the latest attack in the countdown to next month's presidential elections....

The attacker was approaching a checkpoint where cars were being searched on a road leading to the governor's compound in Maymana, the Faryab provincial capital, when he detonated his explosives hidden in the rickshaw, the officials said.

However, most of the victims were vendors peddling fresh bread and other people at the busy roadside market area.

Yup.

By Rusty Shackleford, Ph.D. at 05:29 PM | Comments |

January 27, 2014

Awesome: Afghanistan Begins Releasing Captured Jihadists

Exactly how is our little project of state-building in Afghanistan going? Not good:

The US government has condemned an ordered release of the first wave of 88 prisoners from Bagram prison, saying that more than 40 per cent of the prisoners who are set to go were involved in direct attacks against the US and Afghan forces.

The Afghan Review Board (ARB), led by Abdul Shakoor Dadras, has ordered the release of the first 37 of 88 from Bagram, which the US military categorised them as “dangerous”.

Michelle has more.

As I've come to realize over the past 10 years of blogging, there's not much we can do to improve the sh*thole that is Afghanistan. The best strategy moving forward is to put them on notice that should they ever allow the Taliban to come back to power that we will not hesitate to wipe the country from the face of the Earth. And yes, I do mean that literally.

By Rusty Shackleford, Ph.D. at 11:05 AM | Comments |

January 23, 2014

Democracy! Video Shows Afghan Politician Calling for Jihad Against the US

His name is Abdul Sattar Khawasi and he's a member of Afghanistan's parliament representing a political party with Taliban sympathies. After a US raid, he had this to say about the liberators of his country:

"Jihad is legitimate against the U.S., and silence against the U.S. is an act in violation of religion, I am obligated to tell you," Khawasi says in part of the video....

The footage also shows the MP, a member of the U.S.-backed government in Kabul since joining Parliament in 2004, accusing other government officials of being "collaborators" for working alongside the U.S.

"Now lets focus on the government officials, these corrupt miscreants have no right to fire on you, I promise revenge," Khawasi said.

And by firing on "you" he meant the Taliban. See, us = Taliban, you = everyone else.

Meanwhile, the President of Afghanistan blames the US for a Taliban attack that targetted Western civilians in Kabul:

After the Taliban attack on a Lebanese restaurant in Kabul last week that left 21 people dead, including 13 foreign civilians, Karzai insinuated that the U.S. was responsible for the foreign deaths in Kabul because of the Afghan deaths in the Ghorband operation.
Because I'm sure the Taliban would pick up their toys and go home if the US left.

And, just to be clear, I think it's high time we got out of Dodge. We did what we came to do. We kicked the Taliban's ass. It's this whole nation-building thing that I don't think we should be involved in. If the Afghans want a state bad enough, let them fight for it. And should the Taliban come back to power we have plenty of nukes that haven't been tested in awhile.

By Rusty Shackleford, Ph.D. at 11:29 AM | Comments |

December 17, 2013

6 US Troops Killed in Copter Crash in A-Stan, Taliban Claim they Shot it Down

RIP. Our prayers are with the families:

Six U.S. troops were killed in a helicopter crash on Tuesday in southern Afghanistan.

Other media reported the troops were NATO members; Fox News confirmed the troops were part of the NATO force but were Americans.

“The cause of the crash is under investigation,” NATO said in a statement reported by Fox News. “However, initial reporting indicates there was no enemy activity in the area at the time”

Military officials suspect engine failure is the cause of the crash, CNN reported.

And on cue, the Taliban take credit:
Mujahideen of Islamic Emirate have shot down the helicopter of foreign troops in Shahjoi district today, according to officials reporting from southern Zabul province.

The attack took place at around 03:00 pm local time today as the helicopter was flying over Ibraheem Khelo area at a low altitude, causing the chopper to violently plummet onto the ground in a ball of fire which killed all 8 invaders and crew onboard.

Don't put too much faith in the Taliban's claim. They always claim helicopter crashes are the result of the 'mujahideen'.

By Rusty Shackleford, Ph.D. at 01:28 PM | Comments |

November 12, 2013

Last Jew in Afghanistan Not so Positive About Americans

At least he's not a Christian. There are none of them left:

In his 50s, Simintov is the last known Afghan Jew to remain in the country. He has become something of a celebrity over the years and his rivalry with the next-to-last Jew, who died in 2005, inspired a play.

Mindful of Afghanistan's extremely conservative Muslim culture, Simintov tries not to advertise his identity to protect the Balkh Bastan or Ancient Balkh kebab cafe he opened four years ago, naming it after a northern Afghan province....

There are no Afghan Christians left, at least none who is open about it, and the only permanent church is inside the Italian diplomatic compound. There is a small Hindu population, but it is shrinking rapidly....

However resolute Simintov remains about practising his faith, he is embittered - even enraged - by misfortune and by the failure of the U.S-led NATO force to create conditions for peace and security without the threat of the Taliban.

"It is better to see a dog than to see an American," he said. "If the situation in the country gets worse, I will escape."

Right, blame the Americans ... says the guy who's afraid to wear a kippah and is quick to point out that only Muslims touch the food he serves.

Thanks to @pspoole

By Rusty Shackleford, Ph.D. at 12:42 PM | Comments |

October 29, 2013

Report: Afghanistan Supporting Pakistani Taliban, Pakistan Supporting Afghan Taliban

For years I've been trying to start a war between India and Pakistan. The simple logic being that Pakistan ought not to exist, and I'd rather India nuke them than us. The problem with this is that so many Indians would die in the process. I like Indians.

But maybe I had that all wrong. Maybe we should give nukes to Afghanistan? Afghanistan is gone, Pakistan is gone. Win-win:

According to the article, which cites unnamed US and Afghan officials, the government of President Hamid Karzai is courting the Pakistani Taliban, who are close to what's left of Al Qaeda in region, as a way to counterbalance the Pakistani military's support for the Afghan Taliban...

But the Times story says the actual purpose of Mehsud's visit was to promise aid to the Pakistani Taliban in their fight. It's a cheap way for Afghanistan to project force and influcence inside Pakistan and, in theory, make Pakistan more amenable to Afghan positions at future negotiations.

Now, not content to be merely the target of a proxy war, the Afghan government decided to recruit proxies of its own by seeking to aid the Pakistan Taliban in their fight against Pakistan’s security forces, according to Afghan officials. And they were beginning to make progress over the past year, they say, before the American raid exposed them.

Okay, so we don't give them nukes. Worst case scenario: Afghan and Pakistani Taliban are so busy attacking Afghanistan and Pakistan that they lose interest in killing us.

Again: win-win.

Yeah, I know it won't play out exactly like that.

You may say that I'm a dreamer, but I'm not the only one......

By Rusty Shackleford, Ph.D. at 12:03 PM | Comments |

October 21, 2013

Meanwhile in The Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan

I wonder how things are going with the just war?

NBC:

An Afghan army special forces commander has defected to an insurgent group allied with the Taliban in a Humvee truck packed with his team's guns and high-tech equipment, officials in the eastern Kunar province said on Sunday.
That good huh?

Makes me want to stop blogging and go do some actual work.

By Howie at 09:03 AM | Comments |

October 14, 2013

Fourth Insider Attack this Month Kills US Soldier

If I understand the post-2014 "withdraw" plan correctly, we actually aren't leaving. Instead, we'll be there training Afghans and in other support roles. So, we're talking about more contact between US servicemen and women with Afghan troops.

How, exactly, is that supposed to make me feel better when this sh*t keeps happening?

A man wearing an Afghan army uniform shot at US soldiers in eastern Afghanistan, killing at least one serviceman on Sunday, local officials and the Nato-led coalition said.

The so-called “insider attack” in Paktika province is the fourth in less than a month and is likely to strain already tense ties between coalition troops and their allies, with most foreign troops scheduled to withdraw by the end of next year.

H/T: Rantburg

The bad news is that Sec. of State Kerry seems to have worked out the kinks with Karzai so that we'll be stuck in Afghanistan forever. The analogy with Japan or Germany is a bad one. I know we've been in those countries for well over half a century, the differences are too many to mention but let me address two. First, Germany and Japan were nation states before we occupied them. Afghanistan is a state, but not a nation. Second, Germany and Japan had functioning governments before they were occupied. Afghanistan has never had anything like a government in the modern sense. We weren't engaged in state building in these two countries post WWII, we were engaged in state rebuilding.

The crux being that with or without us Afghanistan will be a mess.

By Rusty Shackleford, Ph.D. at 10:20 AM | Comments |

October 03, 2013

Good News: Guy Who Invited bin Laden to Afghanistan to Run for President

If Abdul Rassoul Sayyaf wins, it's time to nuke 'em:

The Philippine insurgent group Abu Sayyaf is named after him and he was mentioned in the 9/11 commission reports as "mentor" to Khalid Sheikh Muhammad, the operational mastermind of the September 11, 2001, attacks.

A conservative Islamic scholar, Sayyaf ran paramilitary training camps in Afghanistan and Pakistan in the 1980s and 1990s, and it was there he meet al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden.

In 1996, Sayyaf helped bin Laden return to Afghanistan after he was ejected from Sudan. Bin Laden stayed in the country under the protection of the Taliban until the American-led invasion of late 2001.

Hooray democracy!

By Rusty Shackleford, Ph.D. at 01:11 PM | Comments |

September 13, 2013

US Consulate Attacked in Afghan City on Iranian Border

We tried to rebuild. We tried to civilize these people. We failed. I think there is a lesson here:

U.S. State Department deputy spokeswoman Marie Harf said in a statement that the assault began around 5:30 a.m., when "a truck carrying attackers drove to the front gate, and attackers -- possibly firing rocket propelled grenades and assault rifles -- starting firing at Afghan forces and security guards on the exterior of the gates. Shortly after, the entire truck exploded, extensively damaging the front gate."

Harf confirmed that the attack ended after Afghan security forces took control of the outside of the Consulate and that there were no American casualties. It was not entirely clear whether any attackers managed to breach the facility.

I'll just note that Herat is near the Iranian border, so a large percentage of the population is Shia. So, I guess the question is ..... do we know these were Taliban?

By Rusty Shackleford, Ph.D. at 10:25 AM | Comments |

August 12, 2013

US Casualties "Mount" in Afghanistan

Remember how every time someone in our military died in Iraq the headline would always include some variation of the word "mount", "mounting", or "climb"? As if each new casualty marked a new high.

Which, of course, it did. That's just the way math works. One plus any number is greater than the original number.

Moreover, recall that every single casualty was always -- always -- used as a jumping point in the article which would then question President Bush in one way or another.

Oh, how far we've come:

Three US soldiers were killed in Afghanistan's eastern borderlands on Sunday, US and NATO officials said, the first NATO combat deaths this month.
Not only are these deaths not added to previous deaths -- no reference to "mounting" or "climbing" -- they are the first deaths this month.

But I'm sure the press is going to link these deaths to some Obama Administration policy? Perhaps the so-called Afghanistan surge?

Not even close:

The soldiers, from the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF), were killed by insurgents in Paktia province, a US official told Reuters.
And that's it. That's the entire article. The whole thing.

These people make me sick.

By Rusty Shackleford, Ph.D. at 09:20 AM | Comments |

July 31, 2013

US Tax Dollars Funding al Qaeda & Taliban Supporters

This really sucks, but is it really any surprise? Doesn't the law of percentages kind of dictate that if you spread enough money around a sh*thole like Afghanistan, that you are bound to contract with al Qaeda and Taliban sympathizers?

Even if the number of al Qaeda/Taliban type supporters is on what I reckon to be the low end -- say, 20% -- then it follows that a whole lot of bad guys are going to end up on our payroll. It's expected.

The real problem here is that apparently we know about the bad guys receiving US contracts but we continue to pay them anyway. All in the name of "due process rights".

This is what happens when your government and military are run by lawyers:

Supporters of the Taliban and al-Qaeda in Afghanistan have been getting U.S. military contracts, and American officials are citing “due process rights” as a reason not to cancel the agreements, according to an independent agency monitoring spending.

The U.S. Army Suspension and Debarment Office has declined to act in 43 such cases, John Sopko, the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, said today in a letter accompanying a quarterly report to Congress.

The real essence of the report is that most of the billions of dollars in aid to Afghanistan isn't getting at the "root problem" of that country's instability. Which is accountant speak for there's no amount of money that could be spent by us to to drag these people kicking and screaming into the 19th century.

No, I meant 19th century. Eh, who am I kidding: the 18th century would be an improvement for most of these people.

Thanks to Lou.

By Rusty Shackleford, Ph.D. at 03:43 PM | Comments |

July 24, 2013

Out: Bigfoot and Nessie
In: "The White Taliban"

How long have we been in Afghanistan? Long enough that some US Special Forces have learned to blend in well enough that the locals mistake them for Taliban:

But out in the Arghandab Valley of Kandahar Province, one of the most volatile regions in the country, locals talk about a different breed of American Special Operations forces who settled in around 2005. They are said to drive civilian vehicles, wear local clothes, speak good Pashto – and yes, sport thick beards.

They are so good at blending in that the locals have taken to calling them “Spin Taliban” – Pashto for White Taliban – because of their resemblance to the actual Afghan Taliban, including the trademark black, puffy turbans.

Special Forces .... going native ... in a war that becomes less popular as it drags on and on. The narrative is kind of on the nose, eh?

By Rusty Shackleford, Ph.D. at 02:26 PM | Comments |

July 10, 2013

Insider Attack in Afghanistan Kills 1, Wounds 6

That would be in addition to the 17 women and children killed by the Taliban today. This is why I'm not that phased by word that we might bail out of Afghanistan early.

Early? We've been there for 12 years now. Twelve long years. If twelve years is early, then I'd like to see what a long time means to some of these people.

When we could have and should have applied the lessons of Iraq and quadrupled the number of troops, Obama punted and "settled" for a "surge" which wasn't anything like what was needed. Not. Even. Close.

So, here we are. Twelve years in, and without a stable government in Kabul able to stand on its own two feet.

It's long past time to bail. Let the Afghans work out their own troubles.

We kicked their asses the first time in a matter of weeks. Should they decide to roll over and let the Taliban take control once again, we could do it again in a matter of weeks yet again. And again. And again.

At some point it sinks in: we do not let the Taliban come to power.

Or, it doesn't. And then there's no one left alive in Afghanistan to complain.

Yes, that's where I'm at now.

It's not that I don't value Afghan lives. I do. The innocents affected by the evil doers around them. It breaks my heart.

It's just that I value American lives more.

By Rusty Shackleford, Ph.D. at 05:40 PM | Comments |

June 25, 2013

Peace? No Peace

Yahoo:

Taliban militants attacked key buildings near Afghanistan's presidential palace and the U.S. CIA headquarters in Kabul, a brazen assault that could derail attempts for peace talks to end 12 years of war.

The Taliban, who have said they are willing to take part in talks with the United States and Afghan President Hamid Karzai's administration, said they launched the early morning assault, which triggered a 90-minute firefight.

A U.S. envoy was in Kabul on Tuesday to try to smooth the way forward for the stalled talks in the Gulf state of Qatar ahead of the pullout from Afghanistan of most of the NATO-led troops next year. He had been expected to meet reporters at the U.S. Embassy, but the conference was called off.

Karzai was also due to attend, but his whereabouts were not known. A palace official said he was safe.

By Howie at 08:40 AM | Comments |

May 01, 2013

Deadly Bagram Airfield Crash Caught On Video

(Hat Tip: IHateTheMedia)

From CBC News:

A civilian cargo plane owned by an American company crashed at Bagram Airfield, north of the Afghan capital, soon after takeoff on Monday, killing all seven people aboard, the U.S.-led military coalition said.

Incidentally, this video also happens to be another perfect analogy for Obama's budget plan.

By DMartyr at 09:52 AM | Comments |

March 11, 2013

Finally: Some Good News from Afghanistan

We takes what we can gets:

Six Taliban men were killed when the explosives they possessed for making bombs exploded accidently inside a house in southern Helmand province, the Ministry of Defence (MoD) said on Monday.
The way I figure it we get out of Dodge, drop thousands of do-it-yourself bomb making kits, and just let Darwin take care of Afghanistan for us.

By Rusty Shackleford, Ph.D. at 01:51 PM | Comments |

Afghans Kill 2 US Troops

If the Taliban's strategy is to get the US to distrust our Afghan allies then I have to give it to them: it's working:

A police officer opened fire on U.S. and Afghan forces at a police headquarters in eastern Afghanistan on Monday, sparking a firefight that killed two U.S. troops and two other Afghan policemen. The attacker was also killed in the shootout, officials said.
Our prayers are with the families of those killed.

By Rusty Shackleford, Ph.D. at 01:19 PM | Comments |

March 08, 2013

Afghan Soldiers Attack US Base

This thing in Afghanistan would go a whole lot better if there were no Afghanis to deal with:

We can confirm that one ISAF-contracted civilian died when three individuals wearing Afghan National Security Forces uniforms and driving an ANSF vehicle forced their way on base and turned their weapons against International Security Assistance Force service members and civilians today in eastern Afghanistan. All three individuals were killed during the engagement and the area has been secured by ISAF and ANSF. Afghan and coalition officials are looking into the circumstances of this incident.
More here.

By Rusty Shackleford, Ph.D. at 03:12 PM | Comments |

Afghan Security Forces Attack US Base In Kapisa

This is the second green-on-blue attack this year

[...]The Khaama report stated that one US soldier and one Afghan soldier were killed in the attack, and that no one was injured. According to ISAF, however, it was a civilian US employee, not a US soldier, who died in the incident.

In response to an inquiry by The Long War Journal as to details of the attack, ISAF stated:

We can confirm that one ISAF-contracted civilian died when three individuals wearing Afghan National Security Forces uniforms and driving an ANSF vehicle forced their way on base and turned their weapons against International Security Assistance Force service members and civilians today in eastern Afghanistan. All three individuals were killed during the engagement and the area has been secured by ISAF and ANSF. Afghan and coalition officials are looking into the circumstances of this incident.[More..]
Senseless and cowardly act by the ROPMA.

By Stable Hand at 12:02 PM | Comments |

February 20, 2013

Attn: Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan, AKA The Taliban

Yeah, I like noticed you're following me on twitter yesterday. Thanks dude!

Also yesterday the Taliban's website could be found here.

http://www.shahamat.info
http://www.alemarahnews.com/
http://alemara1.org/

Today? Not so much.

talibanpwnedagain.JPG

It looks like they ran into some sort of DNS issue, hmmm?

Mwuhahahahahhaaaaaaaa!!!

Special Thanks to Zionist Bandwidth Bitch.

By Howie at 08:33 AM | Comments |

February 01, 2013

Obama Foreign Policy! US Says Taliban Can be Part of Afghan Government as Taliban Murder 21 Outside of Mosque

I keep hearing how awesome Hillary Clinton was as Secretary of State and about her "legacy". This will be her legacy:

US Ambassador to Pakistan, Richard Olson, has said the United States is ready to open the door for talks between the Afghan government and the Taliban, adding that the Afghan Taliban could be part of Afghanistan's future if they met conditions to ensure long-term peace and stability in the war-torn country.
Peace? Are you sure he didn't mean piece? You know, a piece of a Shia here, a piece of an infidel there?
An explosion in a market in northwestern Pakistan on Friday killed at least 21 people and wounded 33 in what police described as a suicide bombing...

Abu Omar, a Taliban commander in the neighboring tribal region of North Waziristan, said in a telephone interview that the attack was in revenge for the killing on Thursday of a Sunni cleric....

Friday’s explosion occurred just after Friday Prayer as worshipers filed out of a Sunni mosque and a nearby Shiite place of worship, police officials said. “People were coming out of the mosque when the explosion occurred,” said one officer in Hangu, speaking on the condition of anonymity.

Another police official in Hangu said a suicide bomber had detonated his explosives. While Shiites were the likely target, the dead included people from both Islamic sects, he said. “There are Sunnis and Shias killed.”

Sure, let's make peace with these people. What could possibly go wrong?

Obama's diplomacy: speak loudly and carry a tiny stick.

By Rusty Shackleford, Ph.D. at 01:30 PM | Comments |

January 08, 2013

On-Base Imam Kills British Soldier

In First Insider Attack Of 2013

A member of the Afghan army who acted as a prayer leader for troops has shot dead a British soldier in the year's first insider attack, according to officials in the region.

As many as six British troops were also injured in the shooting in Helmand Province. The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack in a statement released shortly after details emerged, the BBC reported.[More...]

Apparently, the now-dead Imam bastard first turned his weapon on fellow Afghan soldiers but didn't shoot until he turned his weapon on the British soldiers.

Prayers for the family of the fallen soldier. May he RIP.

By Stable Hand at 09:08 AM | Comments |

December 02, 2012

Jalalabad Air Base: Taliban Suicide Bombers Attacked FOB Fenty

Last night, on Twitter, I watched the attack unfold in real time thru Combat Journalist Mustafa Kazemi @combatjourno tweets.

Earlier on Mustafa Kazemi tweeted 1 Afghan soldier was killed. Later this a.m. word is, several US troops were wounded.

By Mustafa Kazemi

Kabul (Combat Journalist) – Taliban insurgents attacked a U.S. Military Air Base early Sunday Morning in Eastern Afghanistan’s Jalalabad city.

Several Taliban insurgents equipped with suicide bombing vests and light assault rifles attacked Forward Operation Base Fenty’s main gate in Jalalabad city around 05:50 GMT on Sunday.

U.S. and Afghan Forces stationed at the Air Base’s entrance responded to the attack that was followed by multiple explosions caused by suicide blasts, according to the multinational International Security Assistance Forces’ Joint Command here in Kabul.

Several U.S. Military troops were wounded as a result of the attack, but the exact figure was not disclosed by the Joint Command due to operational security.

FNC is reporting at least 5 Afghans were killed
The attackers and at least five Afghans were killed, officials said. Taliban spokesman Zabiullah Mujahid claimed responsibility for the assault.

It was the largest attack on the Jalalabad air base since February, when a suicide car bombing at the gate triggered an explosion that killed nine Afghans, six of them civilians[...]

Two Afghan students from a private medical school were caught up in the attack and killed, as were three other Afghans working at the base, Mashreqiwal said. He did not know whether the base workers were private guards, members of the security forces or civilian employees.

Nine attackers took part in the assault in total, he said, three of whom were killed in the suicide blasts and another six gunmen who died in the ensuing fighting that lasted a few hours.

Maj. Martyn Crighton, a spokesman for the international military force in Afghanistan, said that helicopters "were deployed and used."[More]

Our thoughts and prayers are with those affected by this. Prayers also for the quick recovery of our finest and bravest.

By Stable Hand at 10:19 AM | Comments |

November 30, 2012

Bronco Bama/Dems: Al Qaeda is Decimated
North Waziristan: Video Shows Al Qaeda Training Kids As Young As 5

Panetta was right: Al Qaeda battle in Afghanistan to stretch for years. But, don't tell Obama because he won.

Via ZIP

These terrifying pictures show children as young as five being trained to kill with pistols and deadly AK-47 assault rifles.

They were taken from footage of an al Qaeda terror camp in north Waziristan, near the Pakistan-Afghanistan border.

Many of the children are orphans of the terrorist organisation’s ‘martyrs’ following the same deadly route as their fathers.

They are brainwashed into waging Jihad on the West and becoming suicide bombers, the Sunday Mirror reported.

Child abuse, our name is al-Qaeda, Taliban, Hamas, Hezbollah, IRAN, Islamic Jihad, Boko Haram, etc etc etc

By Stable Hand at 11:43 AM | Comments |

November 28, 2012

Afghan Teen Beheaded For Refusing Marriage Proposal

BBC

Afghan police have arrested two men accused of beheading a teenage girl with a knife in northern Kunduz province, officials say.

Prior to the attack, the girl's father had rejected a marriage proposal for his daughter.

"Our investigation shows those who killed her were people who wanted to marry her," police told the BBC.

F'n savages should be castrated with a nail file.

h/t Blazing Cat Fur

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By Stable Hand at 09:54 PM | Comments |

November 13, 2012

#Petraeus Scandal probe ensnares commander of U.S., NATO troops in Afghanistan

This case just got bigger...

Nato commander ensared.

ABOARD A U.S. MILITARY AIRCRAFT — The FBI probe into the sex scandal that led to the resignation of CIA director David Petraeus has expanded to ensnare Gen. John R. Allen, the commander of U.S. and NATO troops in Afghanistan, the Pentagon announced early Tuesday.

According to a senior U.S. defense official, the FBI has uncovered between 20,000 and 30,000 pages of “potentially inappropriate” e-mails between Allen and Jill Kelley, a 37-year-old Tampa woman whose close friendship with Petraeus ultimately led to his downfall. Allen, a Marine, succeeded Petraeus as the top allied commander in Afghanistan in July 2011.

There is something bigger going on here....way bigger.

Related:

We.must.keep.our.eye.on.the.ball: Benghazi

FBI Agents Raid Petraeus Mistress, Paula Broadwell, Home
Report: FBI Agent in Petraeus Case Under Scrutiny For Sending Shirtless Pictures Of Himself..
Did #Petraeus 'Mistress' Reveal 'Classified Information' on #Benghazi?
'Secret' CIA 'Blacksite' (Interrogation Center) Possible Cause For Attack To Free Prisoners

Breaking David Petraeus Resigns as Head of CIA

By Les Nesman at 04:31 AM | Comments |

October 10, 2012

Lara Logan: Radical Islam is Not in Retreat

I had been reading about this speech for a few days now, but haven't linked to anything yet because I hadn't actually seen the speech -- just reaction to it.

But over at This Aint Hell they found the whole thing up at YouTube. It's worth the 20 minutes of your time and completely destroys three four Obama narratives: 1) Killing bin Laden ended al Qaeda; 2) The Arab Spring has been a good thing; 3) There are "moderate" Taliban who can be our peace partners; 4) The "radicals" are a tiny minority within the Islamic world.

By Rusty Shackleford, Ph.D. at 02:42 PM | Comments |

October 01, 2012

Goodbye Afghans!

If democracy and freedom are so precious to them, let them shed their own blood.

I know, we aren't there to build democracy. We are there to ensure the Taliban don't ever come back to power enabling al Qaeda to attack us again. Democracy, we are told, is simply the means to our national interest ends.

But you know what is also a means to ensuring the Taliban never return to power? Nuclear bombs.

By Rusty Shackleford, Ph.D. at 11:03 AM | Comments |

September 21, 2012

Sandcrawler PSA: Re: Afghanistan

Last of 33,000 Surge Troops Leave Afghanistan.

The last of the 33,000 American surge troops sent to Afghanistan two years ago have left the battlefields of Afghanistan, Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta said.


By Howie at 08:12 AM | Comments |

September 18, 2012

Good News: No Joint Patrols

I guess if we're just there to kill a few Taliban now and then we could do that much easier and cheaper from a few bases. Because there is not going to be a lot of training going on.

CBS: The strategy for getting U.S. forces out of Afghanistan depends on training Afghan soldiers and police to protect the country themselves, but on Monday the U.S. military suspended most joint field operations with Afghan forces because so many Americans are being killed by the men they are training.
President SCOAMF is really doing a bang up job in Afghanistan.

By Howie at 07:50 AM | Comments |

August 30, 2012

As Promised

Dancing boobies!

ISLAMABAD – Pakistani intelligence officials confirmed Thursday that a U.S. drone strike last week near the Afghan border killed the son of the founder of the powerful Haqqani militant network, a major blow to one of the most feared groups fighting American troops in Afghanistan.

Photobucket

You may thank the nearest Predator drone pilot for the page full of dancing boobies, men.

Critical Update Thanks to Legionnaire of the Banned for MOAR BOOBIES

By Vinnie at 06:43 PM | Comments |