December 18, 2013

Why We're Taking a Second Look at Assad

Eh, it could be worse:

Mere hours later, the engineer and 20 other members of the Syrian opposition -- doctors, city council members and activists -- escaped from Raqqa into Turkey. They weren't fleeing Syrian President Bashar Assad's regime, but a new and terrible power that has no face and goes by many names. The official name of this al-Qaida branch, which has broken away from Osama Bin Laden's successors, is the "Islamic State of Iraq and Syria" (ISIS). "Daaisch" is the most common abbreviation of the group's name in Syria. "But we call them the Army of Masks," says Basil, the engineer who fled the country, "because their men rarely show their faces. They dress in black, with their faces covered."
In addition to civil rights activist Halaibna, the group's thugs have kidnapped hundreds of others in Raqqa, where Assad's army was driven out back in March. The jihadists seized the chair of the city council, the heads of the civilian opposition, an Italian Jesuit and six European journalists. Anyone who opposes the ISIS fighters, or who is simply considered an unbeliever, disappears.

ISIS maintains four prisons for holding its hostages in this area alone. And Raqqa was only the beginning. In the last four months, the jihadist group, which was still essentially unknown in Syria at the start of this year, has seized control of several cities, as well as strategically important roads, oil fields and granaries.

The article goes on to repeat the party line that it's our fault that al Qaeda is growing so rapidly in Syria because had we just sent arms to the "moderates" then al Qaeda wouldn't be receiving so much support.

And to that I say, bah-humbug!

We actually bombed in Libya, and how'd that work out for us? No, it's not our fault that these people can't get their sh*t together. They've never had it together, and no matter what we do they're never going to get their sh*t together.

Thanks to Lou.

By Rusty Shackleford, Ph.D. at 05:13 PM | Comments |